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Book Vs Movie Podcast

Book Vs. Movie is the podcast that asks the questions "Which was better...the book or the movie?" Spoiler Alert! We give away the main details, uncover the plot points, discuss casting choices and shower with praise (or pummel with snark) as we see fit. Hosts are Margo P. (She's Nacho Mama's Blog) and Margo D. (Creator of Brooklyn Fit Chick.com) and we are not afraid to tell it like it is!
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Now displaying: 2021
Sep 17, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: In a Lonely Place

The 1947 Novel Vs the 1950 Humphrey Bogart

The Margos go back to Bogie and film noir with In a Lonely Place which was written by Dorothy B. Hughes in 1947 which tells the story of a homicidal maniac on the loose in post-War II Los Angeles. Dix Steele was an airman who prowls around LA and its environs in search of the perfect woman to strangle to death. 

In the novel, the story is told from his point of view and his hatred of women and fear of getting caught by his LA detective pal Brub Nocholi and his suspicious wife Sylvia. The story is scary and gripping but in 1950, the Hays code still had a grip on Hollywood and a screenplay filled with murder would shock its audience too much. 

Nicholas Ray directed the 1950 film that stars Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame and over the years has become a film many experts praise for being ahead of its time. Though Bogart is not a killer he has been known to be violent. Dix is a screenwriter and Graham plays Laurel Gray, an actress looking for a good script. 

The story is twisty and weird which makes for a unique film experience. 

So, between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? 

This episode is sponsored by Kensington’s new title Breaking Badger by Shelly Laurenston

The New York Times bestselling author has more sexy shape-shifting antics with this snarky and steamy romance novel!

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The 1947 novel by Dorothy B. Hughes
  • The film noir movies of the time and how Hollywood is presented
  • Biggest differences between book & movie.
  • Starring: Humphrey Bogart (Dixon Steele,) Gloria Grahame (Laurel Gray,) Frank Lovejoy (Brub Nicholai,) and Jeff Donnell (Sylvia Nicholai) 

Clips used:

  • Laurel learns about the murder
  • In a Lonely Place trailer
  • Dix loses it driving
  • Last scene of the film
  • Music by Hadda Brooks 

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com, You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Sep 10, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: AI: Artificial Intelligence

Brian Aldiss’s Supertoys Last All Summer Long Vs. the 2001 Steven Spielberg Film

Twenty years ago, Steven Spielberg released a longtime project with his friend Stanley Kubrick--AI: Artificial Intelligence. Kubrick bought the rights to the 1969 short story from author Brian Aldiss (which appeared as Supertoys Last All Summer Long in the August 1969 issue of the UK edition of Harper’s Bazaar. The story is about a robot child being jettisoned by his parents when permitted to have a baby and a dystopian future where overpopulation has caused the management of families. 

Kubrick liked the idea of a story about a neglectful parent but thought there weren’t any child actors who could accurately play the part. After he died in 1999, Spielberg took over the project and divided to flesh out the story with Mechas (humanoid robots) and hired actor Haley Joel Osment to lead David. A young Mecha is programmed to love his mother. When she decides to abandon him after he has behavioral issues, the story turns into a tale of David, his “Teddy” bear friend, and Jude Law (a hustler Mecha) to now underwater NYC to find the “Blue Fairy” to make him a real boy. 

The film divided the critics and the audience, with some praising the vision and others finding the “Kubrick Vs. Spielberg” styles making a messy picture. Now that 20 years have gone by, there are now think pieces about its brilliance. 

So, between the short story and the movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • David meets an advanced Specialist
  • AI trailer
  • David is driven away 
  • Gigolo Joe talks about David’s mother 
  • David at the Flesh Fair
  • Music by John Williams

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com, You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

 

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Sep 2, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “A Face in the Crowd”

The Budd Schulberg Short Story Vs the Elia Kazan Classic Film

Every once in a while we come across a story that was created decades ago and has themes that transcend time. This is the case with 1957’s A Face in the Crowd which talks about class distinctions in America, the power of the media, what it takes to relate to the “common man” and how power corrupts. (Whoa--this one really stands the test of time!) 

The original story, Your Arkansas Traveler, was featured in a collection from Some Faces in the Crowd by Budd Schulberg and published in 1953. It tells the story of an Arkansas drifter, Lonesome Rhodes (LR,) who rises to fame on regional radio with his country, “aw shucks” style and eventually becomes an egomaniac as a national TV star. Oh, and he has political clout as well!

In the story, he is discovered by radio producer Marcia Jeffries who at first is charmed by LR and his plain-spoken ways. Eventually, she realizes he is a dangerous narcissist and works to stop him from having too much power. LR in the meantime has a wife he needs to get rid of, a teenage bride to keep him company, and a rabid audience that hangs as his every word. In the end, he dies before he can wreak too much havoc. 

Schulberg wrote the screenplay for On the Waterfront and trusted director Elia Kazan to tell his story. The 1957 film stars Andy Griffith, Patricia Neal, Lee Remick, and Walter Matthau and while the film received mixed reviews at the time (the New York Times thought Andy Griffith overshadowed everyone in the film)--it is now considered a prescient classic.

So, between the short story and the movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The original short story by Budd Schulberg
  • Behind the scenes of the movie fleming   
  • Why it was considered controversial at the time 
  • Starring: Andy Griffith (Lonesome Rhodes,) Patricia Neal (Marcia Jeffries,) Anthony Franciosa (Joey DePalma,) Walter Matthau (Mel Miller,) Lee Remick (Betty Lou Fleckum,) and Percy Waram as General Haynesworth.)

Clips used:

  • Marcia meets LR
  • A Face in the Crowd trailer
  • LR and Marcia argue over his marriage
  • “Mama Guitar” & baton scene
  • LR breaks character on the air
  • Walter Matthau’s last scene
  • “Vitajex” commercial/music by Tom Glazer

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Aug 27, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Dangerous Liaisons”

The 1782 Novel Vs the 1985 Play & the 1988 Movie 

The Margos get a little sexy and wicked with this 1782 “libertine novel” from Pierre Chodlerlos de Laclos, a French writer and Army General who ten years before the French Revolution published four volumes of “Les Liaisons dangereuses” about a pair of manipulative rivals in the bourgeoisie. Marquise de Merteuill and her past lover/frenemy Vicomte de Valmont compete via letters to seduce others just for the fun of it. 

They include lonely wife Madame de Tourvel, innocent Cécile de Volanges, and her suitor Le Chevalier Danceny who are all caught up in the web of seduction, lies, and all are caught up in the tragedy. 

The story has been adapted many times as a movie, play, opera, and ballet. The 1988 Stephen Frears film is the first American/English language production and features John Malkovich and Glenn Close as the two evil leads who wreak havoc on characters played by Michelle Pfeiffer, Uma Thurman, and Keanu Reeves (really!) Nominated for several Academy Awards, the movie is now considered a classic and with the gorgeous costumes and art direction--it’s a beauty to watch. 

So, between the novel, the play, and the movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The backstory of the author Pierre Choderlos de Laclos
  • France right before the revolution  
  • The cast members who became sex symbols afterward 
  • Starring: John Malkovich (Valmont,) Glenn Close (Isabelle Merteuil,) Michelle Pfeiffer (Tourvel,) Uma Thurman (Cecile,) Swoosie Kurtz (Madame de Volanges,) and Keanu Reeves as Danceny. 

Clips used:

  • Isabelle talks about why she manipulates men
  • Dangerous Liaisons trailer
  • Valmont promises Tourvel they can be freinds
  • Valmont and Dancey have a duel
  • Audience boos
  • Music by George Fenton

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Aug 19, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Heartburn” 

The “Nora Ephron is a Queen” Episode  

Norah Ephron was one of the most celebrated writers of the 20th Century from her work as an essayist for Esquire to her best-selling novels and screenplays for classic films. She has been honored with Academy Awards, Writer’s Guild Awards, and BAFTAs. She was a food writer and movie director. Known for being tough and uncompromising (who fired a child actor after his day on the set of Sleepless in Seattle!) Yet she was a total romantic who enjoyed a happy marriage with fellow writer Nicholas Pileggi. 

Her first novel, Heartburn, came out in 1983 and was based on her tumultuous marriage to reporter Carl Bernstein (we talked him in our All the President’s Men episode) which ended when he had an affair during her second pregnancy. The “power couple” split and the divorce took years to happen. Mainly because Berstein was concerned about how he would be played in the movie directed by Mike Nichols

Ephron wrote the screenplay for the 1986 film and due to her divorce decree, she had to make sure the character filling for Bernstein (called “Mark Feldman” as a maybe-nod to Mark Felt. The real “Deep Throat” source for Watergate) had to be portrayed as not a jerk. Nichols and Jack Nicholson (who played the Mark Feldman part) were a part of the divorce negotiations. 

Meryl Streep gives an amazing performance as “Rachel Samstat” who loves her husband even though he is having an affair while she is in her second trimester. It’s frustrating to hear her character lose her voice in this translation--but we will talk ALL about that in this episode plus the awful reviews some male critics gave the film. 

Mostly we talk about the wonderful Norah Ephron and why she is one of the wisest, funniest, and most romantic writers of her generation.

So, between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? (Honestly, it is not going to even be close but have a listen anyway!) 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Rachel has a hallucination
  • Heartburn trailer
  • Rachel confronts Mark about his cheating 
  • Rachel hits Mark in the face with a pie
  • Music: Coming Around Again by Carly Simon

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Aug 10, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Almost Famous”

Based on several articles by Cameron Crowe in Rolling Stone Vs the 2000 film 

In 1973, writer Cameron Crowe was just your ordinary 16-year-old on the road with The Allman Brothers writing a cover story about the band’s troubles and successes while going on the road. The resulting article came out in December 1973 and changed his life becoming a well-respected journalist who covered the biggest bands of the 70s including Led Zeppelin, The Who, and The Eagles all before he was old enough to have a driver’s license. 

Years later, he would spend a year undercover as a high school student at Clairmont High School in San Diego to write Fast Times at Ridgemont High  (it would become his first screenplay as well.) Later films of his include Say Anything, Jerry Maguire, and Singles but the film that most closely resembles his life is Almost Famous

The story of William Miller (played by newcomer Patrick Fugit) a teenager who gets the assignment of his dreams--to write about the new band “Stillwater” for Rolling Stone magazine. Along the way, he befriends “Band-Aids” who are NOT groupies but rather muses for their favorite musicians. Led by 16-year-old Penny Lane (Kate Hudson in an Academy Award-nominated performance) she follows lead guitarist Russell Hammond (Billy Crudup) on the road and teaches William how to live life as if there were no tomorrow. 

The movie is filled with rock-n-roll tropes such as greedy managers, awful promoters (Marc Maron’s “lock the gates!” intro on the WTF podcast comes from this movie,) sex, drugs, and misogyny abound. There is also a great deal of heart and warmth here with Frances McDormand playing William’s tough but loving mother. Zooey Deschanel plays his stewardess sister who is running away to find herself in the early 1970s. 

The film was a big hit for all involved and the budget for the soundtrack (which includes more classic rock classics than can seem bearable) was reportedly $3 million. Crowe won an Academy Award for his screenplay and Hudson became the movie Rom-Com queen for the next 20 years. 

There has been controversy, however, with THE ultimate groupie (no shame in her game!) Pamela Des Barres is NOT consulted even though she wrote the seminal work on fandom I’m With the Band. And by the way, aren’t they a little young to be on the road? 

So, between the original Cameron Crow articles and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The life story of Cameron Crowe
  • What classic rock and touring meant in the 1970s 
  • Almost Famous trivia
  • Which actors did their own singing and played their own instruments 
  • The cast: Patrick Fugit (William Miller,) Billy Crudup (Russell Hammond,) Frances McDormand (Elaine Miller,) Kate Hudson (Penny Lane,) Jason Lee (Jeff Bebe,) Zooey Deschanel (Anita Miller,) Anna Paquin (Polexia Aphrodesia,) Fairuza Balk (Sapphire,) Philip Seymour Hoffman (Lester Bangs,) Terry Chen (Ben Fong Torres,) Jimmy Fallon (Dennis Hope,) Marc Maron (angry promoter) and Peter Frampton as Reg.

Clips used:

  • William finds out he is 11
  • Almost Famous trailer
  • Lester Bangs
  • Ben Fong Torres & Rolling Stone 
  • Lock the gates!
  • New manager
  • Frances McDormand talks with Billy Crudup
  • Music Fever Dog by Stillwater 

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

.

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 

 

Aug 5, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Dog Day Afternoon”

The Classic Hollywood 1974 film Vs “The Boys in the Bank” from 1972 article from Life Magazine

On August 22, 1972, John Wojtowicz and two accomplices entered a bank In Brooklyn at 450 Avenue P (in Gravesend) and started a robbery. One left early, (20-year-old Bobby Westeberg) while Wojtowicz and 18-year-old Sal Naturale proceeded to steal almost $200,000 in cash and traveler’s checks before being surrounded by the police. What happened for the next 14 hours was a standoff and media circus for the ages. 

Turns out Wojtowicz said he needed the money for a “sex change” operation (as it was known at the time)  for his partner Ernest Aron. The police brought Aron to the scene straight from the hospital where they had attempted suicide the week before. Another of Wojtowicz lover was brought out and he kissed him on the mouth in front of the news camera which hundreds of locals who made up the crowd. He also threw money into the air and ordered pizza for the bank hostages held inside. 

Eventually, the robbers and many of the bank hostages were taken to JFK airport where Naturale was shot in the chest and killed immediately. Wojtowicz was arrested and eventually spent a few years in jail for his crimes. He married again while in prison and had a tough time holding down a job because of his past. In the end, he was reduced to trying to make some money by posing in front of the bank for autographs. He died of cancer in 2006 at the age of 60. 

Aron eventually had gender reassignment surgery and died from the complications of AIDS in 1987. She took the name, Elizabeth Eden. 

Writers P.F. Kluge and Thomas Moore wrote about the crime and hostage situation on September 22, 1972, for Life magazine and the title of the article was “The Boys in the Bank” that was bought by Warner Brothers pictures and developed into the film Dog Day Afternoon

The 1975 film directed by Sidney Lumet and screenplay by Frank Pierson changes a few of the major details. The lead crook is “Sonny Wortzik” played by Al Pacino and his main cohort is Sal Naturile played by 40-year-old acting legend John Cazale. Filmed in Winsdor Terrace, Brooklyn (near Margo D’s home!) the movie would become a huge moneymaker and nominated for all of the major categories at the Academy Awards in 1976 (and losing most to One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest which was the movie to beat that season.) 

The film is a modern classic and entered in 2009 to the Library of Congress and in the National Film Registry. 

In 2014, The Dog a documentary by filmmakers Allison Berg and Frank Keraudren told the “real” story by following the real John Wojtowicz who painted himself as an early gay rights icon and misunderstood human.  

So, between the original novel and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The backstory behind the 1972 robbery & the aftermath 
  • The biggest differences between the real story and the 1975 film 
  • Rumors as to who was really behind the bank robbery
  • What happened to the main figures 
  • The cast: Al Pacino (Sonny Wotzik,) John Cazale (Sal Naturile,) Charles Durning (Sergeant Eugene Moretti,) Penelope Allen (Sylvia,) Susan Peretz (Angie,) James Broderick (FBI agent,) Lance Henricksen (FBI agent,) Carol Kane (The Squirrel,) and Chris Sarandon as Leon Shermer.

Clips used:

  • The bank robbery
  • Dog Day Afternoon trailer
  • Sonny negotiates with Moretti
  • “Leon” comes to the site
  • Final phone call for Sonny and his wife
  • “Wyoming?” 
  • Music Amoreena by Elton John

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 




Jul 30, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Logan’s Run”

The Cult Classic Novel & Film That Inspired Generations of SciFi Fans 

Imagine living in a world where you can live as free as you please, but you have to allow yourself to be killed at 21 (or 30?) This dystopian tale comes from two science fiction authors, William F. Nolan and George Clayton Johson in 1976 with Logan’s Run. Logan is a “Sandman” who chases “runners” who wish to escape their creepy fate. 

The original story was inspired by the turbulent campus life in the 1960s and caught the imagination of SciFi fans everywhere. The setting is 2116, and from the “Little War,” it was decided that in order for earth to survive, the population needed to be kept artificially down. People live with a “palm flower” that changes color as they age. When they hit 21, it is called their ‘last day” and to report to “Sleepshop.” It is there they are killed using a pleasure-increasing toxic gas. 

Logan being a Deep Sleep Operative, he can tell when people are trying to escape their fate and run to a free land called “Sanctuary.” He uses a gun called a “homer” because it can “home” their body heat and evaporate them. Sandmen also use martial arts and generally have no sympathy for runners. 

Logan’s love interest in “Jessica 6” distrusts him at first but eventually along with Logan’s friend Francis they off to the Sanctuary. Francis, it turns out, is an oldster of 42 whose palm flower malfunctioned and he got by with plastic surgery to change his appearance Jessica and Logan are then sent off on a rocket outside of Mars to start their lives over. 

The 1976 movie stars Michael York as Logan 5 and Jenny Agutter as Jessica 6. The movie changes the maximum age to 30 and this time the “last dayers” end their lives in a game called the “Carrousel” which causes them to evaporate in front of an audience. 

In 2274, every person is implanted with a “life clock” that shows their age. Logan 5 and his friend Francis 7 are both Sandmen who one day kill a runner who had an “ankh” jewelry symbol. Turns out this symbol is for people who are looking for “Sanctuary” and that is how he identifies Jessica 6. 

They go on the run together and there is quite a bit of wackiness with a robot named Box who wants to freeze and eat them, Washington DC mossed over and an old man with cats who wants to help them. There are also sexy costumes and special effects which were considered a big deal at the time. (Wow!) 

So, between the original novel and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The journey of the 1967 story to the 1976 movie
  • Biggest changes between book & movie
  • The 1977 TV series that surprisingly did not take off
  • The special effects of the time
  • The cast: Michael York (Logan 5,) Jenny Agutter (Jessica 6,) Richard Jordan (Francis 7,) Roscoe Lee Browne (Box voice), Farrah Fawcett-Majors (Holly 13), and Peter Ustinov as the Old Man. 

Clips used:

  • Logan decides to run
  • Logan’s Run trailer
  • “The Carousel” 
  • Logan procures Jessica 6 
  • Jessica and Logan meet “The Box”
  • Music by Jerry Goldsmith

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Jul 21, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Legally Blonde”

The Amanda Brown Story Vs the Reese Witherspoon Movie 

The Margos are donning their pink outfits and getting our nails done in preparation for one of our most fun episodes--Legally Blonde. The original writer is Amanda Brown who based some of the stories about Elle Woods on her experience as a  law student at Stanford University. As she said at the time ‘I wrote it all on pink paper with my furry pink pen.” It has an unusual publishing history as it was rejected by every major publishing house but became a bidding war with the movie studios. MGM won the bid and Reese Witherspoon was set to star. 

Screenwriters Karen McCullah Lutz and Kirsten Smith spent two weeks at Stanford Law School in 2000 to get a flavor of what campus life is like. Reese Witherspoon spent hundreds of dollars on a bar tab for a group of sorority girls to pick up their lingo and a movie was created. 

The original story is missing a few things from the beloved film including the character of Emmett Richmond (played by Luke Wilson) and Elle actually working hard to get into law school. 

At first, in the age of raunchy films like American Pie being popular with audiences, the movie had an edgier quality. But writers McCullah Lutz & Smith decided to add more romance (and NOT with her law professor,) give her favorite manicurist her own backstory and change the plot of the murder trials. 

The film was a massive hit when released and its feminist slant and fashions inspired generations of women to become lawyers. There was a sequel in 2003 and a musical that appeared on both Broadway and the London stage. 

So, between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The journey of the novel to screenplay
  • Biggest changes between book & movie
  • The casting process and how the wardrobe is the main factor of the film’s popularity
  • The cast: Reese Witherspoon (Elle Woods,) Moonie (Bruiser Woods,) Selma Blair (Vivian,) Luke Wilson (Emmett Richmond,) Matthew Davis (Warner,) Victor Garber (Professor Callahan,) Jennifer Coolidge (Paulette,) Holland Taylor (Professor Stromwell,) Ali Larter (Brooke,) Jessica Cauffiel (Margot,) and Linda Cardellini (Chutney Windham.) 

Clips used:

  • Elle’s entrance video
  • Legally Blonde trailer
  • First day of school
  • Elle meets Emmett 
  • Bend and Snap!
  • Perfect Day by Hoku 

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Jul 14, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “The War of the Worlds”

The H.G. Wells Science Fiction Classic Vs the 2005 Steven Spielberg Movie

The Margos go back to both the world of science fiction and the film work of Steven Spielberg talking about the H.G. Wells classic novel The War of the Worlds (1898) which has been adapted as a successful radio program, films, and a TV series. 

The novel is about a martian invasion that hits London and an unnamed narrator who escapes, is separated from his wife, and then has up close and traumatic interactions with the Martians who are taking over England. They use heat rays as a weapon and depend on human blood to feed themselves. The narrator meets with people underground on his way back home who want to fight the invaders. He eventually gets home (after being taken care of by a kindly family) and reunites with his wife who somehow survives the alien attacks. In the end, the Martians were killed by “earthly pathogens.” 

Considered one of the first novels that supposed that otherworldly creatures could be smarter than humans--the story is a classic and the basis/inspiration for science fiction work for decades afterward. 

In 1938, Orson Welles’s radio program, created a one-hour play based on the story (which Welles most likely never read) and included some of his favorite writers and produces for The Mercury Theatre on the Air including John Houseman and Howard Koch. The setting was central New Jersey and the resulting panic was caused by an unsuspecting audience who thought the drama was real. Welles had to perform a mea culpa for the press (which he loved!) and it is considered one of the best radio dramas ever produced. 

In this episode, we focus more on 2005’s The War of the Worlds directed by Spielberg which stars Tom Cruise, Dakota Fanning, and Tim Robbins and is set in New Jersey and New England. Two other members of the cast were in the 1953 adaptation--Ann Robinson and Gene Barry. 

So, between the novel, radio program, and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The life of author H.G. Wells and how he changed science fiction
  • Orson Welles’s influence on the storytelling of the 1938 radio play
  • The major differences between the novel and the movie
  • The cast: Tom Cruise (Ray Ferrier,) Dakota Fanning (Rachel Ferrier,) Justin Chatwin (Robbie Ferrier,) Mirando Otto (Mary Ann Ferrier,) Tim Robbins (Harlan Ogilvy,) Ann Robinson (Grandmother,) and Gene Barry (Grandfather) 

Clips used:

  • The Mercury Theatre 1938 production
  • The War of the Worlds trailer
  • “Ferry Disaster”
  • “Fight on the Hill”
  •  “No Shield”
  • Music by John Williams

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Jul 8, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “The Fast and the Furious”

The 1998 Kenneth Li article from Vibe Vs the 2001 Film 

Since the Pandemic started in Mach 2020, we gave committed to bringing a weekly show and that means we often use shorter literary sources as the basis for the episode. Novellas, songs, plays, and yes--magazine articles which is happening in this show.  

In 1998, Daily News writer Kenneth Li was writing tech and feature stories when he heard about a racing circuit happening late at night in New York City. Instead of muscle cars of yore, these new riders used brands like Mitsubishi and Nissan and take off at top speeds to evade the police and have some bragging rights. “Racer X” appeared in the May 1998 Vibe magazine and caught the eye of producer Neal H. Moritz who moved the action to the West Coast and the next thing you know--a franchise is born! 

 

The first to sign up was hunky young actor Paul Walker (RIP) and the rest of the cast featured a variety of races and attitudes which appealed to a larger audience. The first movie (which we discuss in this episode) was directed by Rob Cohen and went on to make over $200 million worldwide box office. 

F9: The First Saga was just released at the time we are recording this episode. 

So, between the article and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The background on Kenneth Li’s article (and that he interviewed one of the Margos in 1999 for a tech story!) 
  • The legacy the sequels have on the movie industry and its fans
  • The special effects and stunt work. 
  • The cast: Paul Walker (Brian O’Conner,) Vin Diesel (Dominic Toretto,) Michelle Rodriguez (Letty Ortiz,) Jordana Brewster (Mia Toretto,) Rick Yune (Johnny Tran,) Chad Lindberg (Jesse,) and Ja Rule.  

Clips used:

  • Brian joins the race
  • The Fast and the Furious  trailer
  • Example of music on top of the music 
  • Vin Diesel yelling 
  • Music by BT

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

 

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Jun 30, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Fantastic Mr. Fox”

The Margos Cover Roald Dahl (Again!)

One of the most covered authors on Book Vs Movie is also one of the most controversial and we discuss why in this episode dedicated to Roald Dahl and his 1970 children’s novel Fantastic Mr. Fox. The story about a smart fox, his loving family, and his cunning ways to feed them involves tricking the local farmers. The original illustrations were from Donald Chaffin and you can listen to Dahl read his own stories on Audible. 

In 2009, director Wes Anderson directed a stop-motion animation version of the tale with George Clooney, Meryl Streep, and Bill Murray among the big-name cast providing the voices. Director Noah Baumbach helped with the screenplay and the film was a critical favorite but had the misfortune of being released the same year as the movie Up

So, between the book and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Roald Dahl reads from Fantastic Mr. Fox (intro)
  • Fantastic Mr. Fox trailer
  • Mr. Fox meets with lawyer Clive Badger
  • Psychotic Rat
  • Mr. Fox meets the Wolf 
  • Fantastic Mr. Fox  by Jarvis Cocker

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Jun 25, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Argo”

The 2007 Wired Article Vs the 2012 Movie Adaptation 

 

The Margos are on an adventure for this episode that is based on a true story--Argo. The 2007 Wired magazine article (“The Great Escape: How the CIA Used a Fake Sci-Fi Flick to RescueAmericans From Tehran”) by writer Joshua Bearman is thrilling as it talks about what is known as the “Canadian Caper” in 1979. After the siege of the U.S. Embassy in Iran, several American embassy personnel hid in a Canadian diplomat’s home. 

The “caper” part is when CIA officer Tony Mendez (who wrote his own account in the book “The Master of Disguise” as Antonio J. Mendez) created a fake film crew for a movie called “Argo” and with the help of Canadian passports and some clever improvising, rescued those people on January 27, 1980. 

Part of the project's success was creating a phony Hollywood company “Studio Six Productions” and makeup artists John Chambers and Robert Sidell helped create the faux publicity campaign with ads in the Hollywood Reporter and Variety magazines. Chambers was later awarded the CIA “Intelligence Medal of Merit” for his help in the rescue. 

 

The Ben Affleck-directed uses many of the true elements of the film and adds a few select Hollywood flourishes (like casting himself as the lead) and a kickass rock soundtrack to make a thrilling ride of a film. 

Soon after its release, several articles were talking about some of the most glaring omissions in the story, including the role of the Canadian embassy in the rescue. The film was nominated for several prestigious awards including Best Picture for the Academy Awards and the Golden Globes. 

The cast is stellar with Bryan Cranston, Alan Arkin, John Goodman, Kyle Chandler, and an uncredited Philip Baker Hall as CIA Director Stansfield Turner.

So, between the Wired article and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The backstory of the Iran Hostage situation and the Canadian Caper
  • Major differences between the actual events and the Hollywood version of what happened
  • What President Jimmy Carter thinks about the movie 
  • The cast: Ben Affleck (Tony Mendez,) Bryan Cranston (Jack O’ Donnell,) Alan Arkin (Lester Siegel,) John Goodman (John Chambers,) Tate Donovan (Robert Anders,) Clea DuVall (Cora Amber-Lijek,) Rory Cochrane (Lee Schatz,) Victor Garber (Ken Taylor,) Kyle Chandler (Hamilton Jordan,) and Richard Kind as Max Klein. 

Clips used:

  • Argo wins Best Picture (with Michelle Obama & Jack Nicholson
  • Argo trailer
  • Alan Arkin deals with “Max Klein” 
  • John Chambers answers the production office phone
  • Ending chase scene
  • Argo score by Alexandre Desplat

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

.

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 

 

Jun 16, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “The Little Prince”

The 1943 Novel Vs the 2015 Adaptation 

The Margos say “Vive La France!” as we dive into the classic children’s book The Little Prince by author & illustrator Antoine de Saint-Exupery originally published in 1943. The author was a successful poet, journalist, and aviator for many years before he was lost on a WWII mission off Marseille in occupied France in July 1944. Previous to his assumed death, he was the recipient of many awards including the Legion of Honor (1930 & 1939) and the U.S. National Book Award (1940.) 

Saint-Exupery was visiting America during WWII and felt passionate about saving France from German occupation. One of his friends at the time was Charles Lindbergh who was an ardent anti-interventionist and part of the hero of The Little Prince is based on the appearance of Lindbergh’s blonde son Land. 

He and his wife Rose also lived in Quebec for a while where he was inspired by philosophers trying to make sense of war and how France can regain its independence and Democracy. Even though he was well in his 40s--Saint-Exupery served in the French Air Force and served in several missions before his plane disappeared. 

 

The Little Prince would eventually become one of the most successful children’s books in the history of publishing translated into over 300 languages and adapted as a film, opera, radio theater, and ballet. The narrator begins the story by telling the audience he doesn’t trust adults as they do not receive things “normally.”  He begins conversations by showing them a picture of a snake eating an elephant and the grownups always said it looks like a hat. 

The narrator is an aviator who crashes his plane in the Sahara desert. With only a few days of supplies, he meets a little blonde boy (The Little Prince) who tells his life story beginning as an alien from another planet (an asteroid.) He talks about being in love with a “vain” rose and then leaving that planet to save others who need him. 

This includes six other planets:

  • One with a king with no subjects
  • A man who needs to be admired all of the time
  • A man who drinks to forget 
  • A rich businessman who can’t see the beauty of the stars
  • A lamplighter
  • An old geographer who teaches about “ephemeral” being

The Little Prince travels across planet earth and meets many creatures and people who help him grow as a person. (There are so many lessons here. It is hard to name them all!) 

The 2015 animated film was directed by Mark Osbourne and features the voices of Jeff Bridges, Rachel McAdams, Paul Rudd, Bud Cort & Albert Brooks (!) and beautiful visuals throughout. It also has a young girl as our protagonist which is one of the major changes in the adaptation. 

The movie did very well with critics and won the 2016 Cesar Awards for “Best Animated Film.” 

So between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The biography of Antoine de Saint-Exupery 
  • The different adaptations over the years of the material 
  • The terribly sad "real" ending of the story and what we thought of it as children
  • The cast: Riley Osbourne (Little Prince,) Mackenzie Foy (the little girl,) Jeff Bridges (Aviator,) Rachel McAdams (mother,) Marion Cotillard (the Rose,) Benecio del Toro (the Snake,) Albert Brooks (Businessman,) Paul Rudd (the Adult Prince,) Paul Giamatti (Academy Teacher,) Bud Cort (the King,) and Ricky Gervais (the Conceited Man.) 

Clips used:

  • The Little Girl meets The Aviator
  • The Little Prince trailer
  • The Little Prince meets the King
  • The Little Prince meets The Conceited Man
  • The Little Prince meets The Businessman
  • The Little Prince meets The Rose
  • The Little Prince soundtrack Hans Zimmer & Richard Harvey

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 

 

Jun 9, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “To Sir, With Love”

The 1959 E.R. Braithewaite Novel Vs the 1967 Sidney Poitier Movie

To Sir, With Love was a smash hit movie in 1967 making over $40 million at the box office and making singer Lulu an international sensation who not only stars in the film but sings the theme song. The Margos take a deep dive into the original work and how it came to be the voice of a generation in London during the “mod” movement. 

The 1959 novel is based on the true-life story of E. R. Braithwaite, a Guyanese-born English/American writer who served in the Royal Air Force during World War II and then gained his education at the City College of New York and his Ph.D. at the University of Cambridge. Despite his exceptional skills and education--as a black man, he had a very difficult time finding a job in the work of his choosing. The racism of the time forced him to find work as a teacher in the East End of London. 

Later he became a social worker and human rights advocate fighting racism and oppression. It is unclear how he felt about the 1967 adaptation which was written and directed by James Clavell who decided to jettison a subplot about interracial romance and focus more on the students.  

The biggest reason for its film’s success was the lead actor Sidney Poitier who was one of the most bankable stars of the 1960s and never really got his due for his box office appeal. He would go on the make millions from this film when the studio gave up on creating a more rough tale that included a sexual assault and/or a “big fight.”

Poitier also appeared in the 1996 Sequel To Sir, With Love II. 

So between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Behave like adults
  • To Sir, With Love trailer
  • Fight scene
  • How ladies and men should behave
  • Last scene with Lulu singing 
  • It’s Getting Harder All the Time  performed by The Mindbenders

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Jun 3, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Whip It”

The 2007 Novel by Shauna Cross Vs the 2009 Drew Barrymore-Directorial Debut

The Margos are feeling some badass girl energy and the need for speed so what is better than entering the world of women’s roller derby competitions to scratch that itch? The 2007 novel Derby Girl by Shauna Cross gives us the fictional world of Bodeen, Texas, and our heroine Bliss Cavender. Bliss is 16. Her mother is a former beauty queen how dreams of her daughter being the queen of the local pageant. Bliss just wants to listen to indie rock and find ironic band shirts at the local thrift shop.

After joining the “Hurl Scouts” roller derby team in Austin, Bliss has her first fling with a bassist, alternately does well & then crashes at school, and ultimately comes to terms with her parents and their various goals for her. The book was named an American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults and on the list for the New York Public Library and author Cross based her own experience on her participation on the Los Angeles Derby Dolls

In 2009,  Drew Barrymore’s production company “Flower Films” bought the rights to the book and hired Cross to write the screenplay for the 2009 movie. It stars Elliot Page, Marcia Gay Harden, Kristen Wiig, and Barrymore who also directed the film. 

So between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The backstory of writer Shauna Cross 
  • The world of roller derby  
  • Drew Barrymore and Flower Films 
  • The cast: Elliot Page (Bliss/Babe Rithluess,) Alia Shawkat (Pash,) Marcia Gay Harden (Brooke Cavendar,) Daniel Stern (Earl Cavendar,) Landon Pigg (Oliver,) Kirsten Wiig (Maggie Mayhem,) Eve (Rosa Sparks,) Carlo Alban (Birdman,) Andrew Wilson (Razor) and Jimmy Fallon (Hot Tub Johnny Rocket)

Clips used:

  • Bliss’s first time as an official Hurl Scout
  • Whip It  trailer
  • Rules of roller derby
  • Bliss hangs out with Oliver 
  • Maggie Mayhem sets her straight
  • Pot Kettle Black by Tilly and the Wall

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





May 28, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “A Streetcar Named Desire”

The Tennessee Williams Play Song Vs the Elia Kazan Movie

The Margos are feeling very fragile and need to take long, hot baths when discussing one of the greatest dramas of the 20th Century--A Streetcar Named Desire. The play by Tennessee Williams thrilled the Broadway stage in 1947 starring young buck Marlon Brandon who went full method with Kim Hunter, Jessica Tandy, and Karl Malden

The play is Williams’s follow up to the incredible success of The Glass Menagerie in 1944 which was greatly based on his own life story. Williams grew up in an unhappy home and had family members with mental health issues. The writing was his escape and many of his characters tend to be lost souls who are searching for meaning and/or companionship. 

In post-World War 2 America, musicals were making the most money in New York theater but when A Streetcar Named Desire--audiences stood in lines for hours to watch  Brando and his masculinity on full display. He was a fan of Stella Adler and her acting technique which as first scared Jessica Tandy (playing Blanche Dubois--an “aging” southern belle who is looking for help in a time of crisis.”) Her husband, fellow thespian Hume Cronyn convinced this type of drama will change theater forever. 

Taking place in New Orleans in 1947, Blanche Dubois is a woman who has just lost her family home in Laurel, Mississippi, and moves in with her younger sister Stella (Kim Hunter) and her brutish husband Stanley Kowalski. Brando plays Stanley as a cross between man & animal who resents his sister-in-law moving into their tiny home. 

The tension between Blanche & Stanley fuels most of the scenes and has consequences for everyone in their lives culminating in violence. 

The film was directed by Elia Kazan based mostly on his Broadway production though because of the Hays Code, many changes had to be made to make it “appropriate” for a 1950s movie audience. (There were no rating systems back then and movies were meant for a more general audience.) Most of the hyper-sexuality was toned down and were under the guise of symbolism to get their point across. 

It’s one of the top dramas of all time and we really enjoyed digging into the changes with the film (which started with the casting of Vivien Leigh as Blanche who was thought to be more commercial than Jessica Tandy.) 

So between the play and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The life of Tennessee Williams
  • New York theater in the 1940s & 1950s and how it changed acting forever 
  • The backstory and controversial life of Elia Kazan
  • The cast: Marlon Brando (Stanely Kowalski,) Vivien Leigh (Blanche DuBois,) Stella Kawalsky (Kim Hunter,) and Karl Malden as Mitch Mitchell.  

Clips used:

  • Blanche meets Stanley
  • A Streetcar Named Desire trailer
  • “Napoleonic Law” 
  • “Stella!”
  • Mitch confronts Blanche
  • Music by Alex North

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





May 19, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Harper Valley PTA”

The 1968 Song Vs the 1978 Movie (really!)

Ever since the pandemic began, we decided to create a new show each week (rather than biweekly which has been our habit for over six years now) the sources of adaptations have expanded to magazines, novellas, and songs. You would assume a shorter source would make for shorter episodes but, they can bring on just as much of a discussion as a novel. 

This brings us to today’s subject of our podcast--Harper Valley PTA. The song was written by Tom. T. Hall and performed by country singer Jeannie C. Riley in 1968. The story about a “widowed bride” who is slut-shamed by her daughter’s junior high school PTA (Parents Teachers Advisory) and gives a takedown at a meeting that is spectacular in its shade and incisiveness was one of the first feminist anthems and managed to become a number one hit in the U.S. on both the pop and country charts. (Past episode Dolly Parton did the same in 1980 for 9 to 5!)

The 1978 movie is an R-rated cuckoo bananas production starring Barbara Eden (a stone-cold fox!) as Stella Johnson who exacts a Porky’s style revenge on the local yokels who dare to take her on. She also is wooed by an equally sexy Ronny Cox and is teamed up with Nanette Fabray in this film that played in drive-in theaters in 1978 and made millions. 

It features nudity, wrap dresses, elephants, revenge porn, makeovers, and a helicopter proposal. 

So between the song and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The origin of the song and famous recordings
  • The unusual release of the movie 
  • 1970s feminism  
  • The cast: Barbara Eden (Stella Johnson, ) Ronny Cox (Willis Newton,) Nanette Fabray (Alice Finley,) Louis Nye (Kirby Baker,) Audrey Christie (Flora Simpson Reilly,) John Fielder (Bobby Taylor,) and Susan Swift (Dee Johnson.) 

Clips used:

  • Harper Valley PTA (Jeannie C. Reilly)
  • Harper Valley PTA (Stella approaches the PTA meeting)
  • Ode to Billy Joe by Bobbie Gentry
  • Return to Harper Valley by Jeannie C.Reilly 
  • Stella and Alice sing together
  • The Sex Ed teacher gets her comeuppance 

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

.

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





May 12, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Arrival”

The Ted Chiang Novella Vs the Amy Adams Film

The Margos are looking into the world of language and SciFi with the Ted Chiang novella Story of Your Life published in 1998 and the 2016 movie directed by Denis Villeneuve Arrival.  

(Warning! Spoilers coming right your way!)

In the story, Dr. Louise Banks is a linguist and narrator tasked to help the U.S. Government with a group of alien shapeships who suddenly arrive. The aliens are “heptapods” and it is Banks’s job to try and create a common language with them. She is helped by Dr. Gary Donnelly and the two make contact with two heptapods named Flapper and Raspberry. 

During this assignment, she learns that she will one day become a mother to a daughter who will die young. She can see in the future all of these interactions with her. She can also see that she marries Dr. Donnelly and he leaves her in the future. 

If you have knowledge of the future, do you have an obligation to let others know? What if you have a child with someone and know when they will die? What is your obligation with this knowledge?

The movie Arrival stars Amy Adams as Dr. Banks and Jeremy Renner (known as Ian Donnelly in the film) It would go on to receive eight Academy Awards nominations including for Best  Best Picture and Best Director. But NOT for Best Actress for Adams. BOO!

So between the book and the film--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • Bio of author Ted Chiang
  • The differences between book and film
  • Would you want to know 
  • The cast: Amy Adams (Dr. Louise Banks,) Jeremy Renner (Ian Donelly,) Forest Whitaker (Colonel Weber,) Michael Stuhlbarg (Agent Halpern,) Mark O’Brien (Captain Marks,) and Tzi Ma (General Shang.) 

Clips used:

    • Arrival trailer
    • “A proper introduction…”
    • “The nature of questions”

 

 

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

 

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





May 5, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button”

The F. Scott Fitzgerald Short Story Vs the David Fincher Movie

The Margos take on the world of magical realism with The Curious Case of Benjamin Button which was written by F. Scott Fitzgerald and published in Collier’s Magazine in 1922. The main character, Benjamin Button, is born looking and behaving like a 70-year-old man. Gradually it is revealed that Benjamin is aging backward so when he is 18 in his heart, he looks and acts like a 50-year-old man. 

In his lifetime, his father puts him in charge of the family business, marries a beautiful younger woman, enlists to fight in the Spanish American War, has a son, and then his family must deal with the consequences of him aging back to his birth state. 

The David Fincher 2008 adaptation stars Brad Pitt as Benjamin and Cate Blanchett as his love interest Daisy. There are several changes between the short story and the multiple Academy Award-nominated film. We are here to talk about it! 

So between the book and the film--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Benjamin Button is “saved”
  • Benjamin meets Elizabeth Abbott
  • Benjamin and Daisy reflect on middle age
  • Brad Pitt’s last soliloquy 

 

 

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Apr 29, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Being There”

The 1970 Satirical Novel Vs the 1979 Classic Film

The film Being There and its star Peter Sellers was a big deal in 1980 when the film was released. Based on a novella by Jerzy Kosinski (who won an Academy Award and Golden Globe for the screenplay) the story of “Chance”, a simple gardener who grew up on an estate and never experienced the outside world in an engaging way except for television for his whole life. 

When his benefactor and/or father dies, he must leave his townhouse and try to forge a life for himself with no identity and no education. Luckily, he is soon being taken care of by elderly businessman Ben Rand and his younger wife Eve who mistakenly almost completely runs him over. 

While she calls him “Chauncey Gardner,” we (the audience) know that his name is Chance and he has no idea what is happening in real life. When the President of the U.S. pays a visit to Rand, he is charmed by Chauncey’s lack of guile and a simplistic worldview. 

Soon enough, Chauncey Gardner is the hit of Washington DC and the media that seeks his opinion on everything related to inflation and the economy. 

The film, directed by Hal Ashby, is a modern classic taking on the shallowness of the media when it comes to uncovering “the truth” and pop culture. 

So between the book and the film--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Chance meets the President
  • Being There  trailer 
  • Chance meets Thomas Franklin & Sally Hayes.
  • Final scene deciding on whether or not to run him for President
  • Basketball Jones by Cheech & Chong

 

 

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Apr 21, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Love Story”

The 1970 Novel & Film Explores Love, Loss, and the Use of the Word “Sorry”

Since we have just been added to the amazing lineup shows that are a part of the Frolic Podcast Network, the Margos thought it was time to cover a classic book & film that our listeners are clamoring for since the start of the show. 

In 1969, author and screenwriter Erich Segal pitched a film to his literary agent Lois Wallace at the William Morris Agency called ‘Love Story.’ She wisely advised him to write it as a book and then sell the rights to a movie studio. The book was a smash hit and sold millions of copies in time for the December movie release starring Ryan O’Neal and Ali MacGraw

You could not escape the book, movie, the music, or the ‘Ali McGraw disease” which became a common film trope. It was completely maligned by snobs as pablum but the public didn’t care what the critics thought. The film earned over $100 million at the box office and would later be the highest-rated TV Movie of 1972. 

The story of rich kid Oliver, his working-class girlfriend Jenny, and their tragic love affair still pulls in viewers 50+ years later and we aim to try and figure out why. 

So between the book and the film--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Oliver & Jenny meet-cute
  • Love Story trailer 
  • Oliver proposes to Jenny
  • Jenny claims “love means never having to say you’re sorry”
  • Doctors tell Oliver that Jenny is sick
  • Jenny’s last scene (“the Ali McGraw disease”)

 

 

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic. media/podcasts

. 

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R 

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Apr 15, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Father of the Bride”

The 1949 Novel Vs the 1950 Elizabeth Taylor Classic 

(Okay, we mention the 90s remake as well!)

 

Love is in the air and the Margos are ready for romance with the book & movie Father of the Bride.  Our focus is the book by Edward Streeter and the movie directed by Vincent Minelli that stars Spencer Tracy and Elizabeth Taylor. (The 90s remake with Steve Martin and Martin Short is a part of the conversation as well because--duh!) 

The book & film from 1950 focus on Stanley T. Banks who is married (to wife Ellie) with three grown children when his 24-year-old  daughter Kay announces her engagement to Buckley Dunstan. Buckley seems like a nice man from a good family but Kay’s parents worry about him providing for her but he soon wins them over. 

The hijinks of the story happen when Stanley and Ellie Banks agree to save costs by opening up their home for the reception--for over 250 people. In the end, Stanley’s home is so crowded that he misses his chance to kiss the bride before she leaves for her honeymoon. She does manage to call him from the airport just in time. Ah, romance!

So between the book and the film--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The background of the author Edward Streeter  
  • The casting of Elizabeth Taylor, a former child star who got married for the first time at the film’s release
  • The wedding traditions honored in the film 
  • The cast: Spencer Tracy (Stanley T. Banks,) Joan Bennett (Ellie Banks,) Elizabeth Taylor (Kay Banks,) Don Taylor (Buckley Dunstan,) Billie Burke (Doris Dunstan,) Russ Tamblyn (Tommy Banks,) and Leo G. Carroll as Mr. Missoula. 

Clips used:

  • Stanley Banks talks about how he really feels about weddings
  • Father of the Bride trailer 
  • Stanley has a bad dream
  • Clip from remake (Franck Eggerhoffer) Martin Short, Steve Martin, Kimberly Williams-Paisley & Diane Keaton
  • Outro Music by Adolph Deutsch

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Apr 8, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “The Man Who Fell to Earth”

Our first Walter Tevis novel & the cult David Bowie Film

Author Walter Tevis created some of the most interesting and unique protagonists in fiction including Beth Harmon in The Queen’s Gambit and Eddie Felson in The Hustler. His Jerome Newton of The Man Who Fell to Earth is a humanoid alien from The Altheans who appears to be human (with a drinking problem and large business ambitions) but has a hard time connecting to people on earth emotionally. 

The 1963 SciFi novel by Tevis resembles closely his own life as he was a man who often felt alienated from his own life. He was born to immense wealth and later lived in poverty in Kentucky. He left his wife and children for another woman and had a drinking problem that lasts over two decades. All while achieving his goal to be a working writer who did not have to have a day job to support himself. 

Newton leaves The Altheans to come to earth and make enough money to return home and save his family from death via lack of food & water. He makes a home in Kentucky uses his space technology to make millions in hopes of building a craft to escape this world. 

In the meantime, a woman falls in love with him (he does not return her emotions) and he develops a friendship with a fellow drinker--Nathan Bryce. 

What happens to him when the FBI investigates his background is sad and tragic. This book is a bummer but the writing is beautiful. 

Nicolas Roeg directed the 1976 movie which had a terrible release at the time (multiple film studio issues) but is now considered a cult classic taught in colleges around the world. David Bowie (who was at the Zenith of his fame) plays Newton and gives the best performance of his acting career. 

In this episode, we get the behind-the-scenes trivia from the set, the differences made in the film, and how musician John Phillips wound up creating the soundtrack. 

So between the book and the film--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The life story of Walter Tevis and how he inserted his own foibles and history into his main characters 
  • The casting of David Bowie and what his career was like in the 1970s
  • The soundtrack and whether or not Bowie’s estate will release his supposed version 
  • The behind-the-scenes gossip and trivia
  • The cast: David Bowie (Thomas Jerome Newton,) Rip Torn (Nathan Bryce,) Candy Clark (Mary-Lou,) Buck Henry (Oliver Farnsworth,) and Bernie Casey (Peters.) 

Clips used:

  • Nathan and Thomas meet
  • The Man Who Fell to Earth trailer 
  • John Phillips music
  • Mary-Lou is angry at “Tommy”
  • Outro Music by Louis Armstrong Blueberry Hill

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Apr 1, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “The Women”

The Clare Booth Luce Vs. the 1939 George Cukor Film (Plus, the 2001 Broadway Revival!)

In 1936, the Clare Booth Luce play The Women debuted on Broadway to rave reviews and packed audiences which featured 45 speaking parts for women, while no man is either seen or heard. (Though all of the husbands are spoken about constantly!)

The plot revolves around a group of privileged women who live in New York City and busy themselves with shopping, spa days, and gossip. (60 years before Sex & the City!) Keeping husbands happy unless they “fall in love” with a salesgirl, these women fight for what is theirs. 

Back in the day, one could move to Reno, Nevada for six weeks to gain residency and garner a quickie divorce. (Check out the Trashy Divorces podcast to learn all of the old rules for ending matrimony.)

Our lead Mary (Mrs. Haines) dearly loves her husband but he is having an affair with a perfume salesgirl, Crystal Allen which means he has to make a choice. Stay with the wife and daughter or remarry ASAP and give his wife a huge settlement. 

Off in Reno, Mary and a gaggle of friends and other women meet to gain residency and commiserate in this farcical look at marriage and friendship. 

The 1939 film directed by Book Vs Movie alum George Cukor has over 130 speaking parts for women (even the animals were females!) Led by Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, Rosalind Russell, and Paulette Goddard it happened to come out in an insanely good year for movies (Gone With the Wind, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, The Wizard of Oz, Of Mice and Men to name a few) it did earn any Academy Award nominations--but the film has become a classic along with several Broadway revivals. 

So between the original play and the film--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The life of Clare Booth Luce and the world of NYC socialites in the middle of the 20th Century. 
  • The unique style of the play & the 2001 star-studded version that was a huge success
  • The Technicolor fashion show (yay or nay?) 
  • The behind-the-scenes gossip and trivia
  • The cast: Norma Shearer (Mary,) Joan Crawford (Crystal Allen,) Rosalind Russell (Sylvia,) Mary Boland (Flora,) Paulette Goddard (Miriam,) Joan Fontaine (Peggy,) Lucile Watson (Mrs. Morehead,) Virginia Weidler (Little Mary,) and Marjorie Main (Lucy.) 

Clips used:

  • Sylvia and Miriam fight
  • The Women trailer 
  • Sylvia & Peggy meet Crystal Allen
  • Mary gets marriage advice from her mother
  • Countess De Lave meets Mary and Miriam
  • Edith (Jennifer Goodwin) gets schooled by her nurse (Adina Porter) 2002
  • Jason Alexander in the PBS 2002 special viewing
  • Miriam meets Crystal
  • Outro Music by David Snell & Edward Ward

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 




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