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Book Vs Movie Podcast

Book Vs. Movie is the podcast that asks the questions "Which was better...the book or the movie?" Spoiler Alert! We give away the main details, uncover the plot points, discuss casting choices and shower with praise (or pummel with snark) as we see fit. Hosts are Margo P. (She's Nacho Mama's Blog) and Margo D. (Creator of Brooklyn Fit Chick.com) and we are not afraid to tell it like it is!
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Jan 20, 2022

Book Vs. Movie Hunt for the Wilderpeople

Barry Crump’s 1986 Novella Vs the Taika Waititi 2016 Film

The Margos search for their inner Kiwi in this examination of one of the most creators from New Zealand--writer Barry Crump and filmmaker Taika Waititi. The 2016 film Hunt for the Wilderpeople is an adaptation by Waititi of Crump’s novella Wild Pork and Watercress and would go on to be one of the most successful films from New Zealand. 

The story centers on the relationship between a “juvenile delinquent” Ricky Baker (played by Julian Dennison) who is on the run from child protective services along with his cantankerous uncle Hector Faulkner (Sam Neill) in the bush. Together they learn to live off the land, trust each other, and form a family 

Much of what takes place in the novella is in the 2016 movie that uses gorgeous locations in the New Zealand bush plus amazing performances by an array of local actors including Rachel House as child welfare worker Paula Hall and the director himself as a minister. It opened at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival and is the highest film in New Zealand with $12million at the box office. The population there is almost 5 million to give you an idea of how much the country supported this film. 

Crump (1935-1995) was a legend in New Zealand as a writer, hunter, ad pitchman, and was basically “Crocodile Dundee” before Paul Hogan took over the persona. He and his sidekick Scotty (Lloyd Scott) sold Toyota trucks for over 15 years while he spent a writing career starting in the 1960s talking about the bush country and the people and animals who lived there. 

Taika Waititi is one of the country’s most famous exports as a comedian, director, producer, actor, and screenwriter. Some of his most famous works include What We Do in the Shadows, Thor: Ragnarok, and Jojo Rabbitt. You can tell this is a work of love and we are so excited to talk about it all in this episode!  

So, between the original story and the 2016 adaptation--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Ricky Baker birthday song
  • Hunt for the Wilderpeople trailer
  • Ricky badly explains his circumstances
  • Ricky meets Haku
  • Ricky and Hec being chased by Paula and Andy
  • Music by Moniker 

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

 

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Jan 13, 2022

Book Vs. Movie The Lost Daughter

The 2008 Novel by Elena Ferrante Vs the 2021 Maggie Gyllenhaal Directorial & Screenplay Debut

The Margos are up for a psychological drama and wow--does The Lost Daughter deliver! The movie is the writing & directing debut of actor Maggie Gyllenhaal who tells the story of Leda Caruso (played by the amazing Olivia Colman) who struggles with her identity as a mother years after her children have grown and gone on their own. 

Set in Greece, adult Leda meets the messy and gorgeous Nina who is younger with a small child she seems to love unconditionally. Lena is traveling alone and Nina has a large noisy family with her and between a "detente" on beach chairs and Leda is able to find three-year-old Lena when she takes off on vacation. Nina’s family embraces her without knowing anything about Leda, she has stolen Lena’s beloved doll. 

Leda as a young wife and mother felt left behind in her teaching career and overwhelmed with taking care of two young daughters. She tries to be patient and loving with her spouse and children but she is filled with rage. Leda is not a “natural mother” and feels the best thing to do is to leave her children behind. 

Now she is 48, single, and trying to navigate life knowing her daughters resent her and not knowing how to make amends to them. Nina has her own secrets and questions her own ability as a parent. 

The film by Gyllenhaal asks the audience to try and have empathy for Leda while acknowledging her shortcomings. It’s a truly amazing debut and we have thoughts about both the book and film.  

So, between the original story and the 2021 adaptation--which did we prefer? 

 

This episode is sponsored by Kensington’s newest “small-town romance with a big heart” novel by Kate Pearce Romancing the Rancher. It’s the sixth installment of a series about the Millers of Morgan Valley who live in Morganville, California. 

Pearce is a  New York Times bestselling author and her sexy and heartwarming stories are known to have unconventional characters and subverting romance cliches. In Romancing the Rancher we have Evan Miller who dreams of leaving the family ranch and joining a rodeo tour. He meets Josie Martinez who has bull riding in her genes but dreams of living in San Francisco instead as a tech entrepreneur. 

You can follow Kate Pearce at KatePearce.com and on Twitter @Kate4Queen 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Professor Hardy (Peter Sarsgaard) and Young Leda (Jessie Buckley)
  • The Lost Daughter  trailer
  • Elena loser her doll
  • Bon Jovi dance scene
  • Leda admits to stealing the doll 
  • Music by Dickon Hinchliffe

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Jan 6, 2022

Book Vs. Movie: Heart of Darkness & Apocalypse Now

The Joseph Conrad Classic Novel Vs the Francis Ford Coppola Classic Film

The Margos are going to talk about the multiple “horrors” of the 1899 Joseph Conrad novel Heart of Darkness and the 1979 Apocalypse Now film directed by Francis Ford Coppola which are both considered classics of their genre. They both follow the story of men who enter into dangerous situations which could either be a sly attack of European colonialism or more pandering to the white man as true leader mythos. Either way--we are a podcast that talks about the author, novel and then compares the filmed adaptation to decide which we like better. We are NOT experts on film, books, or colonialism. So if you are writing a paper about any of this, do not consider us a huge source. This is for entertainment! 

Joseph Conrad is considered one of the greatest novelists of all time and was born in Poland to revolutionaries and political activists. He had a chaotic upbringing being raised by his mother’s brother and being educated on and off until his 20s.  Conrad was fluent in Polish, English, and French and was conversational in Greek and German. He spent several years as a merchant marine for France and England. 

He began his writing career in 1895 with Almayer’s Folly and wrote in a style of literary impressionism. His Heart of Darkness was adapted to screen several times over the 20th Century with the most famous being the Francis Ford Coppola film that almost killed him and some of his actors (wait until you hear about it!) 

The story is about ferry boat sailor Charles Marlow who is on a mission to find Mr. Kurtz who has disappeared somewhere along the Congo (though the site is not mentioned in the book) and has become enmeshed in the world of the “natives.” In the end, Kurtz returns to the “civilized” world telling the late Kurtz’s finance he was thinking of her when he died. In reality, he said “the horror.” 

The movie is set in Viet Nam late 1960s during the war with Martin Sheen as Captain Benjamin Willard who is set to look for the missing Colonel Kurtz (Marlon Brando) who has hidden in Cambodia and is considered insane and dangerous. The film was famous for being over budget, stressful, and almost killed several people attached to the project. 

So, between the original story and the 1979 adaptation--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

. 

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

 

 

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Dec 29, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: The Phantom Tollbooth

The 1961Classic Children’s Novel Vs the 1970 Chuck Jones-Directed Movie

The Margos are heading back to the world of Children’s literature with The Phantom Tollbooth by author Norton Juster and illustrations by Jules Feiffer which was first published in 1961. The story of a bored young boy named Milo who finds a magical tollbooth that sets him off on incredible adventures in math and wordplay. Along the way, he meets a big dog named Tock who keeps him on time as he reaches the Kingdom of Wisdom and develops a love of learning and puns. 

Juster was given a Ford Foundation grant in 1958 to write the story but it wasn’t until his neighbor Jules Feiffer came up with the unique illustrations that the story came to life. It’s now considered a classic and therefore tough to adapt to screen. 

Animation superstar Chuck Jones directed the film for MGM (Juster hated the final product) and it stars Butch Patrick, Mel Blanc, and June Foray

So, between the original story and the 1970 adaptation--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • How the book came to life
  • The life lessons encouraged in the book
  • The main differences between the book and movie
  • Starring: Butch Patrick, Mel Blanc, and June Foray.

Clips used:

 

  • Words in a Word 

 

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Dec 16, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: Hercule Poirot’s Christmas

Agatha Christie’s Holiday Mystery Vs the David Suchet “Poirot” TV Series

The Margos return to Agatha Christie and one of her most famous detectives with Hercule Poirot’s Christmas which was originally released in 1938. The “locked room mystery” is one of her most well-loved stories. This being the holiday season, we thought it made for a perfect inclusion to our December episodes! 

A family returns home to visit with their elderly (and rich) father during the Christmas holidays and is soon found murdered in his locked bedroom. The family switches blame upon one another constantly but Poirot uncovers clues that show the culprit who exacted revenge as a man who hated his father for abandoning his mother. 

Agatha Christie’s Poirot, with actor David Suchet, aired this episode in December 1994 (Season Six, Episode 1) 

So, between the original story and the TV adaptation--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Poirot agrees to the Christmas job
  • Poirot  trailer
  • Poirot meets Old Simeon 
  • Simeon is killed
  • Poirot explains how the murder happened
  • Poirot exposes the real killer
  • Poirot gets his Christmas gift
  • Theme music for Agatha Christie’s Poirot

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Dec 9, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: The Year Without a Santa Clause

The Rankin/Bass 1974 Classic Special Based on a Light Verse Book 

For many 70s kids, the Rankin/Bass specials with their catchy music and stop motion animation were high art. From Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer to Santa Clause is Coming to Town their specials garnered big ratings and helped popularize holiday music. One of their most iconic specials was based on a 1956 Phillis McGinley book The Year Without a Santa Clause which told the story of a burnt-out Kris Kringle who wanted to take leave for one Christmas. 

McGinley (1905-1978) was a master of the “light verse” and used humor to describe everyday life. Throughout her writing career (as a poet and children’s author) she loved to talk about humility and living a simple, suburban life. She was not aligned with Sylvia Plath or Betty Friedan who questioned the purpose of being a woman in the 20th Century. McGinley was a lonely child who married at 32 (late for the time) and lived a Mad Men kind of life in Larchmont, NY. 

The Year Without a Santa Claus was first printed in Good Housekeeping magazine and was later published as a book. Boris Karloff recorded a version for Capitol Records shortly before his death in 1969. In the story, Santa has a bad cold just before the holidays and feels as if he is not important to kids anymore. When the children of the world learn this, they gladly send him their toys to finally give him the Christmas of his dreams. Knowing he is loved sends him back to his old Santa ways.

The TV special adds elves Jingle & Jangle who along with reindeer Vixen look for children who still care about Santa. They are shot down (!) by competing Snow & Heat Misers who want to control the weather. In the southern part of the United States, they get into all kinds of trouble with some incredibly catchy tunes and performances by Shirley Booth, Mickey Rooney, and Dick Shawn. Does the spirit of Christmas win out? Duh! 

So, between the original story and the classic TV special--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The incredible career of Phyllis McGinley
  • The holiday specials of the 1960s and 1970s
  • Stop-motion used a form of animation.  
  • Starring: Shirley Booth (Mrs. Clause,) Mickey Rooney (Santa Klaus,) Dick Shawn (Snow Miser), and George S. Irving as the Heat Miser.

Clips used:

  • Boris Karloff reads The Year Without a Santa Clause
  • The Year Without a Santa Clause  trailer
  • Heat Miser
  • Cold Miser 
  • Santa rescues the elves
  • Music by Maury Laws

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Dec 1, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: The Bishop’s Wife

The 1928 novel by Robert Nathan Vs the 1947 Classic Cary Grant Film

It’s December at Book vs Movie and we are excited about covering holiday-themed films including this selection--The Bishop’s Wife. The original novella was written by Robert Nathan in 1928 is the story of a preacher, Henry Boughman, who dreams of building a huge cathedral at the expense of his relationship with his wife Julia. 

An angel, Michael, appears to help Henry and his family learn that family & love is more important than status. In the meantime, Michael Falls in love with Julia and is distraught to hear they can never have a “mortal love.” Julia decides to try for another baby to fulfill her needs. 

The book is an exploration of faith with vivid conversations between the preacher and a Jewish businessman and Professor Wutheridge who both wish to find out the source of why he is so single-focused on religious expression. 

The movie, which features some child actors from the recently released It’s a Wonderful Life, took some liberties from the book and focused more on the possible romance of Julia and “Dudley” (Cary Grant in a typically amazing performance.” The film was directed by Henry Koster and stars David Niven and Loretta Young

So, between the original story and the movie--which did we prefer? 

This episode is sponsored by Kensington’s newest romance novel by acclaimed South African author Therese Beharrie And They Lived Happily Ever After about a romance novelist, Gaia Anders,  who has an active dream life. In fact, everything she dreams she puts into her stories which double as her love life. Gaia’s waking life can’t compare to her dreams. 

In fact, her childhood was incredibly lonely and she is very shy of romance until she meets her best friend’s brother, Jacob Scott. Jacob is a workaholic with no time for relationships, but he crushes hard for Aiden and wonders how he can get her attention. Jacob has his own demons to conquer as he begins to literally share his dreams with Gaia.

Can they find love while uncovering personal hard truths? 

The story takes place in modern-day Captain Town, South African and you can follow her on ThereseBeharrie.com. Follow the hashtag #OwnVoices Rom-Com to learn about Therese and other romance authors of color. 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The life of writer Robert Nathan and his famous relatives
  • The theme of religious devotion in the early 20th Century in the U.S. 
  • The main differences between the novella & film. 
  • Starring: David Niven (Bishop Henry Brougham,) Loretta Young (Julia,) Cary Grant (Dudley,) Monty Woolley (Professor Wutheridge,) James Gleason (Sylvester,) Gladys Cooper (Mrs. Agnes Hamilton,) Elsa Lanchester (Matilda,) Sarah Haden (Mrs. Duffy,) Karolyn Grimes (Debby,) and Robert J. Anderson

Clips used:

  • Cary Grant meets Debby
  • The Bishop’s Wife  trailer
  • The kids play snowball
  • Dudley flirts with Julia
  • Preacher Henry gives a sermon
  • Music by The Robert Mitchell Boys Choir 

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Nov 24, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: Bedknobs and Broomsticks

The Marty Norton Novels During WW2 Vs the 1971 Groovy Disney Film

The Margos are closing out our “Month of Disney” with the 50th Anniversary of Bedknobs and Broomsticks a partly animated film that is based on the wonderful stories by Mary Norton. An English writer of children’s books and was best known for the SciFi-Fantasy collection The Borrowers in the 1950s. For this story, she uses some supernatural elements to tell the tale of a trio of British kids during WW2 who are hiding out in the English countryside. They meet a local villager, Miss Price, who turns out to be an apprentice witch. 

The stories appeared as The Magic Bed Knob; or How to Become a Witch in Ten Easy Lessons and Bonfires and Broomsticks which in 1957 became Bedknobs and Broomsticks. The property was sold to Disney and was developed for years in the wake of the Mary Poppins success of the early 1960s. 

The movie takes place in 1940 where three kids (Carrie, Charlie, and Paul) are evacuated from London to live in Pepperidge Eye near the Dorset Coast at the start of the War. The Nazis are a big menace and Miss Price is studying witchcraft in order to fight them. With her magic spell, she creates a bed knob that can travel through space and time. In the movie, she is played by Angela Lansbury (a Book Vs Movie favorite!) and along with David Tomlinson (who has a tragic personal story!) they go on a weird and wonderful adventure that includes playing soccer with talking animals and invisible soldiers coming to their rescue to fight off the Germans. 

This production was one of the last for the Sherman Brothers for Disney and features some of their classic catchy music and a dance sequence that is a progressive step forward (for 1971 Disney!)  

So, between the original story and the animated movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The backdrop of WW2 London and how it changed art created at that time
  • How Fascism is explained in this story
  • The main differences between the children’s novels & film. 
  • Starring: Angela Lansbury (Miss Price,) David Tomlinson (Mr. Browne,) Ian Weighill (Charlie Rawlins,) Cindy O’Callaghan (Carrie Rawlins,) Roy Snart (Paul Rawlins,) Roddy McDowell (Mr. Rowan Jelk,) Sam Jaffe (Bookman,) and Tessie O’Shea as Jessie Hobday. 

Clips used:

  • “The Beautiful Briny”
  • Bedknobs and Broomsticks  trailer
  • “Eglantine” 
  • “Portobello Road” 
  • “Substitutiary Locomotion”
  • “A Step in the Right Direction” 
  • Music by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 




Nov 17, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: Pinocchio

The Italian Children’s Novel Vs the 1940 Animated Film

The Margos are feeling very Italian in this episode devoted to the famous story about a marionette who wishes to be a real boy when he grows up. The Adventures of Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi was originally published in a series of magazine articles in 1881. When it was released as a book, it became a worldwide hit and is one of the most translated books of all time. 

The story takes place in Tuscany, Italy as Gepetto, a lonely craftsman, finds a piece of wood that talks ad he decides to create a marionette boy to be his son. Right away, his nose grows when he tells a lie and Pinocchio proves to be a handful as a child. He runs away as soon as he is built and Gepetto is arrested for supposedly mistreating him. Pinocchio kills the cricket who tries to warn him about behaving badly! 

The plot of this book is next level kooky with killer cats and foxes, talking crickets, fairies, and ‘The Green Fisherman”. It’s amazing, but wow! 

In 1940, Walt Disney Productions presented Pinocchio as their second animated feature (after Snow White and the Seven Dwarves) and though it did well at the Academy Awards, it was something of a flop at the time. This being a Disney production, that only meant that eventually, it would find an audience and the classic we know it is now. 

So, between the original story and the animated movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Pinocchio “I’ve Got No Strings”
  • Pinocchio  trailer
  • “Monstro!”
  • Pinocchio and Lampwick
  • Pinocchio is a boy
  • Music by Leigh Harline and Paul J. Smith 

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Nov 11, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: Beauty & the Beast

The French Fairy Tale from the 1700s Vs the 1991 Animated Classic

The Margos continue our month of Disney films with the 1991 classic Beauty and the Beast which is based on a fairy tale written in 1740 by Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villenenueva and then later abridged by Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont in 1756 for a collection of children’s stories.  

The simplest version is by de Beaumont. A French merchant has six children with “Beauty” being the youngest daughter. She is considered the most beautiful and has the nicest in temperament so she is her father’s favorite. When he loses his fortunes and then has the opportunity to get it back, she only asks for a rose from him as they have not grown in over a year. 

Her father tries to take a rose from a garden but is stopped by “The Beast” who runs the manor. The Beast asks the merchant to send his daughter to live with him as his fiance. He treats her well (though she is basically a captive) and she is kept company with a fairy (who wishes she would treat the Beast as more than just a  friend) and animated furniture who act as servants for the Beast. 

Eventually, Beauty goes home and then comes back to find the Beast dying from her absence. She kisses him and he becomes a handsome Prince. They get married and live happily ever after. 

Disney attempted to make this as an animated picture in the mid 20th Century but no one could figure how to adapt it. With the success of The Little Mermaid in 1989, a new team with Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise, Linda Woolverton, Howard Ashman, and Alan Menken created a masterpiece that lives on to this day. (30 years after its release!) 

So, between the fairy tale and the animated movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Belle meets “Mrs. Potts” and the crew
  • Beauty and the Beast 1991 trailer
  • Gaston proposes to Belle
  • The Beast Presents the library
  • Belle & Beast dance
  • Belle comes back to rescue the beast
  • Music & Lyrics by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Nov 4, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: Sleeping Beauty

The Fairy Tale from the 1600s Vs the the1959 Disney Animated Film

The Margos are feeling kind of Disney this month so we are dedicating our next few episodes to those animated classics beginning with Sleeping Beauty from 1959. At the time, it received mixed reviews for its obvious comparison to Snow White & the Seven Dwarves which was considered a masterpiece. 

There are several origin stories for this specific tale but we are mainly focused on the Charles Perrault version in 1697 and was later translated by the Brothers Grimm. The plot is a beautiful princess is born and seven goof fairies give her certain special powers (Beauty, music, wit, grace, dance, and goodness) with the sixth one feeling left out and ignored. That fairy puts a curse on the baby who will prick her finger on a spindle and die. The seventh fairy tries to reverse the curse by putting her to sleep instead of dying with the chance she will wake up when kissed by her true love. 

100 years later she awakens when a prince meets her and falls in love with her. They get married and have two children who are of ogre origin. The Ogress Queen wants to eat the kids but is tricked into eating goat and lamb instead. The King eventually saves them all. The Grimm Brothers’ version does not include ogres. 

The animated film took several years to complete and came with all sorts of internal issues (including director Wilfred Jackson’s heart attack in 1953) and the hiring and firing of other directors who could not agree on the ultimate vision. The character of Maleficent was created for the film and her look & performance hold up until this day. 

So, between the fairy tale and the animated movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Maleficent puts a spell on the baby princess
  • Sleeping Beauty  trailer
  • The Prince and Princess meet-cute 
  • Maleficent hypnotizes the princess
  • Music by George Bruns (Tchaikovsky’s Sleeping Beauty Ballet)

 

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Oct 28, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: The Bad Seed 

The 1954 Novel Vs the1956 Film

The Margos finish out the month of October with our final scary book & movie for the season--The Bad Seed. Written by William March and published in 1954 shortly before his death by a heart attack at the age of 60. The first adaptation was a play in the same year the book was published and starred Nancy Kelly (who won the Tony in 1955 for Best Actress,) Patty McCormack, and Eileen Heckert who would all go on to play their same parts in the film version in 1956. 

The story of Rhoda Penmark, an eight-year-old child who just happens to possess murderous impulses, and her mother who may or may not be the “reason” she is a sociopath was a HUGE publishing hit and nominated for the National Book Award for Fiction.  Part of it was the psychology used to try and find out why Christine is so afraid of her daughter and why she feels responsible due to her own serial killer parent. (If it’s not one thing, it’s your mother!)  

The film earned Kelly, Heckert, and McCormack Academy Award nominations for their performances and earned $4 million at the box office. The ending changed dramatically from the original version to the film due to the Hays Code but it still delivers scares after all of these years. 

So, between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The life of writer William March
  • How psychology was used blatantly in movies in the 1950s. 
  • The main differences between the novel & film. 
  • Starring: Nancy Kelly (Christine Penmark,) Patty McCormack (Rhoda Penmark,) Henry Jones (Leroy Jessup,) Eileen Heckert (Hortense Daigle,) Evelyn Varden (Monica Breedlove,) Willam Hopper (Kenneth Penmark,) and Paul Fix as Richard Bravo. 

Clips used:

  • Leroy taunts Rhoda
  • The Bad Seed  trailer
  • Rhoda burns Leroy
  • Monica and crew talk about psychology and murder
  • Christine talks about being adopted 
  • Music by Alex North

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

.

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Oct 22, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: The Picture of Dorian Gray 

The Oliver Wilde Novella Vs the 1945 Film Starring Angela Lansbury

The month of October is one of our favorites because we get to indulge our love for scary ghost stories! This episode focuses on one of writer Oscar Wilde’s biggest commercial and critical successes--The Picture of Dorian Gray. Wilde is one of those intimidating subjects to cover as he is one of the most controversial and celebrated writers & thinkers of the 19th Century. Fans worship his every bon mot and admire his bravery to live his life on his own terms. He died in 1900 at the age of 46 but his legacy looms large to this day. 

Originally published in Lippincott’s Magazine in 1890, the story of The Picture of Dorian Gray was created out of a dinner conversation between Wilde and Sherlock Holmes creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Dorian Gray is the subject of a painting by Basil Hallward who one can say has a bit of a crush on Gray. Being a libertine, Gray wants to stay beautiful forever and is granted his wish. 

The portrait remains in his attic and ages as he cavorts around Victorian England which scandalized the world back when it was first published. The official Wilde-approved version is at the Morgan Library in New York City. It features his thoughts on sex, sexual desire, and “art for art’s sake.” 

The story has been adapted dozens of times over the years, but the 1945 version directed by Albert Lewin is the most critically praised. Angela Lansbury earned an Academy Award Nomination for Best Supporting Actress playing Sibyl Vane 

So, between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • The artist what his creation has done to Dorian Gray
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray  trailer
  • Dorian watches Sibyl Vane sing 
  • Dorian falls in love with Sibyl
  • Lord Henry tells Dorian to live life to the fullest
  • Good-Bye Little Yellow Bird by C.W. Murphy & William Hargreaves

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Oct 14, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: Invasion of the Body 

The 1955 Novel by Jack Finney Vs the 1956 Classic Film

Our “Spooky Movies in October” continues with Invasion of the Body Snatchers, a novel by Jack Finney, and the movie starring Kevin McCarthy (who also made a cameo in the 1978 remake!) The story of aliens invading earth and creating “pod people” to take over the human race was (probably) an allegory for the House Unamerican Activities that was looking for Communists in the U.S. during the 1930s-1950s. The author would go on to even greater success with his novel Time and Again in 1970 which dealt with time travel.  

The 1956 movie was directed by Don Siegel (Escape from Alcatraz, Dirty Harry) and produced by Walter Wanger who was starting his career over after a 1951 scandal when he shot his wife’s (Joan Bennett) agent and lover. (Check out Karina Longworth’s podcast Love is a Crime to learn more!)

The film made a few changes to the source material and was made with mostly a group of unknown and character actors to become a huge hit. The story here takes place in fictional Santa Mira in the mid-1950s (unlike 1970s Mill Valley, CA in the novel.) Our lead, played by McCarthy, is a psychiatrist and not a physician and in the end--well, you need to listen to our show to find out!

In 1994, the film was selected for preservation by the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress. There have been several remakes and similar stories told over the years but the 1956 version remains a classic. 

So, between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The biography of Jack Finney
  • The political atmosphere in the 1950s about space & science
  • The main differences between the novel & film. 
  • Starring: Kevin McCarthy (Dr. Miles Bennell,) Dana Wynter (Becky Driscoll,) King Donovan (Jack Belicec,) Carolyn Jones (Teddy Belicec,) and Richard Deacon (Mel from The Dick Van Dyke Show!) as Dr. Bassett. 

Clips used:

  • Kevin McCarthy in the first scene of the film
  • Invasions of the Body Snatchers  trailer
  • The last scene with Dana Wynter
  • The group finds the first pod
  • Music by Carmen Dragon

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Oct 8, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: The Invisible Man

The 1897 Novel by H.G. Wells  Vs the 2020 Elisabeth Moss Adaptation

The Margos love the spookiness of October and this episode is dedicated to the classic H.G. Wells The Invisible Man which was first published in 1897 as a serialized story. The tale of a mysterious man who shows up at an inn in an English village and becomes a monster that frightens everyone around him has been adapted several times over the last 100+ years. 

For this episode, we have a more feminist slant with Universal Pictures (which cornered the market on monster movies in the 40s & 50s) initially wanting to create an Invisible Man/ Mummy as a shared “dark universe.”  However, when the Tom Cruise movie flopped, it was given to Jason Blum of Blumhouse Productions to revive and market. 

Elisabeth Moss plays a woman (Cecilia Kass) trying to escape an abusive relationship when he seemingly late boyfriend attacks her wearing an invisible suit. Her character is gaslit everywhere she goes including at the police station where they decide she is mentally unstable and causing her own problems. The film takes many liberties from the source material and was a huge hit bringing in $143 million at the box office and on streaming (it was released just before COVID took over movie theater viewing.) 

So, between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Cecilia thinks he is in her room 
  • The Invisible Man  trailer
  • Cecilia escapes
  • Cecilia meets her sister for lunch
  • Last scene of the film
  • Music by Benjamin Wallfisch

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

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Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Sep 30, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: The Parent Trap

The 1949 Novel by Erich Kastner Vs the 1961 Disney Classic Film

The Margos are twinning this week talking about Lottie/Lisa & Sharon/Susan--the lead characters from the Erich Kastner german novel Das Doppelte Lottchen. The author’s life is fascinating and we discuss it in this episode. A pacifist who fought for Germany in WW1, Kastner became a leftist, pacifist who warned about german authoritarianism. The Nazi party actually burned his books and forbade him to work during WW2. 

The story that will soon be known as The Parent Trap is about twin girls who meet at summer camp and learn they are sisters and a product of a divorced family. They decide to switch places (and homes) to get to know the parent they never met before. Also, to bring their parents back together. The book features illustrations of Walter Trier which really brings the story to life. It’s considered a classic in children’s literature and Kastner earned the Hans Christian Anderson Award for writing in 1960 and was nominated for the Nobel Prize for Literature four times in his lifetime. 

The 1961 film was written and directed by David Swift and features an incredible performance by 15-year-old Hayley Mills who would go on to be a Disney superstar. (We don’t touch on the 1998 remake with Lindsay Lohan, sorry for those fans!)

So, between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

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Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Sep 17, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: In a Lonely Place

The 1947 Novel Vs the 1950 Humphrey Bogart

The Margos go back to Bogie and film noir with In a Lonely Place which was written by Dorothy B. Hughes in 1947 which tells the story of a homicidal maniac on the loose in post-War II Los Angeles. Dix Steele was an airman who prowls around LA and its environs in search of the perfect woman to strangle to death. 

In the novel, the story is told from his point of view and his hatred of women and fear of getting caught by his LA detective pal Brub Nocholi and his suspicious wife Sylvia. The story is scary and gripping but in 1950, the Hays code still had a grip on Hollywood and a screenplay filled with murder would shock its audience too much. 

Nicholas Ray directed the 1950 film that stars Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame and over the years has become a film many experts praise for being ahead of its time. Though Bogart is not a killer he has been known to be violent. Dix is a screenwriter and Graham plays Laurel Gray, an actress looking for a good script. 

The story is twisty and weird which makes for a unique film experience. 

So, between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? 

This episode is sponsored by Kensington’s new title Breaking Badger by Shelly Laurenston

The New York Times bestselling author has more sexy shape-shifting antics with this snarky and steamy romance novel!

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The 1947 novel by Dorothy B. Hughes
  • The film noir movies of the time and how Hollywood is presented
  • Biggest differences between book & movie.
  • Starring: Humphrey Bogart (Dixon Steele,) Gloria Grahame (Laurel Gray,) Frank Lovejoy (Brub Nicholai,) and Jeff Donnell (Sylvia Nicholai) 

Clips used:

  • Laurel learns about the murder
  • In a Lonely Place trailer
  • Dix loses it driving
  • Last scene of the film
  • Music by Hadda Brooks 

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

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Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Sep 10, 2021

Book Vs. Movie: AI: Artificial Intelligence

Brian Aldiss’s Supertoys Last All Summer Long Vs. the 2001 Steven Spielberg Film

Twenty years ago, Steven Spielberg released a longtime project with his friend Stanley Kubrick--AI: Artificial Intelligence. Kubrick bought the rights to the 1969 short story from author Brian Aldiss (which appeared as Supertoys Last All Summer Long in the August 1969 issue of the UK edition of Harper’s Bazaar. The story is about a robot child being jettisoned by his parents when permitted to have a baby and a dystopian future where overpopulation has caused the management of families. 

Kubrick liked the idea of a story about a neglectful parent but thought there weren’t any child actors who could accurately play the part. After he died in 1999, Spielberg took over the project and divided to flesh out the story with Mechas (humanoid robots) and hired actor Haley Joel Osment to lead David. A young Mecha is programmed to love his mother. When she decides to abandon him after he has behavioral issues, the story turns into a tale of David, his “Teddy” bear friend, and Jude Law (a hustler Mecha) to now underwater NYC to find the “Blue Fairy” to make him a real boy. 

The film divided the critics and the audience, with some praising the vision and others finding the “Kubrick Vs. Spielberg” styles making a messy picture. Now that 20 years have gone by, there are now think pieces about its brilliance. 

So, between the short story and the movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • David meets an advanced Specialist
  • AI trailer
  • David is driven away 
  • Gigolo Joe talks about David’s mother 
  • David at the Flesh Fair
  • Music by John Williams

Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

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Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Sep 2, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “A Face in the Crowd”

The Budd Schulberg Short Story Vs the Elia Kazan Classic Film

Every once in a while we come across a story that was created decades ago and has themes that transcend time. This is the case with 1957’s A Face in the Crowd which talks about class distinctions in America, the power of the media, what it takes to relate to the “common man” and how power corrupts. (Whoa--this one really stands the test of time!) 

The original story, Your Arkansas Traveler, was featured in a collection from Some Faces in the Crowd by Budd Schulberg and published in 1953. It tells the story of an Arkansas drifter, Lonesome Rhodes (LR,) who rises to fame on regional radio with his country, “aw shucks” style and eventually becomes an egomaniac as a national TV star. Oh, and he has political clout as well!

In the story, he is discovered by radio producer Marcia Jeffries who at first is charmed by LR and his plain-spoken ways. Eventually, she realizes he is a dangerous narcissist and works to stop him from having too much power. LR in the meantime has a wife he needs to get rid of, a teenage bride to keep him company, and a rabid audience that hangs as his every word. In the end, he dies before he can wreak too much havoc. 

Schulberg wrote the screenplay for On the Waterfront and trusted director Elia Kazan to tell his story. The 1957 film stars Andy Griffith, Patricia Neal, Lee Remick, and Walter Matthau and while the film received mixed reviews at the time (the New York Times thought Andy Griffith overshadowed everyone in the film)--it is now considered a prescient classic.

So, between the short story and the movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The original short story by Budd Schulberg
  • Behind the scenes of the movie fleming   
  • Why it was considered controversial at the time 
  • Starring: Andy Griffith (Lonesome Rhodes,) Patricia Neal (Marcia Jeffries,) Anthony Franciosa (Joey DePalma,) Walter Matthau (Mel Miller,) Lee Remick (Betty Lou Fleckum,) and Percy Waram as General Haynesworth.)

Clips used:

  • Marcia meets LR
  • A Face in the Crowd trailer
  • LR and Marcia argue over his marriage
  • “Mama Guitar” & baton scene
  • LR breaks character on the air
  • Walter Matthau’s last scene
  • “Vitajex” commercial/music by Tom Glazer

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Aug 27, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Dangerous Liaisons”

The 1782 Novel Vs the 1985 Play & the 1988 Movie 

The Margos get a little sexy and wicked with this 1782 “libertine novel” from Pierre Chodlerlos de Laclos, a French writer and Army General who ten years before the French Revolution published four volumes of “Les Liaisons dangereuses” about a pair of manipulative rivals in the bourgeoisie. Marquise de Merteuill and her past lover/frenemy Vicomte de Valmont compete via letters to seduce others just for the fun of it. 

They include lonely wife Madame de Tourvel, innocent Cécile de Volanges, and her suitor Le Chevalier Danceny who are all caught up in the web of seduction, lies, and all are caught up in the tragedy. 

The story has been adapted many times as a movie, play, opera, and ballet. The 1988 Stephen Frears film is the first American/English language production and features John Malkovich and Glenn Close as the two evil leads who wreak havoc on characters played by Michelle Pfeiffer, Uma Thurman, and Keanu Reeves (really!) Nominated for several Academy Awards, the movie is now considered a classic and with the gorgeous costumes and art direction--it’s a beauty to watch. 

So, between the novel, the play, and the movie--which did we prefer? 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The backstory of the author Pierre Choderlos de Laclos
  • France right before the revolution  
  • The cast members who became sex symbols afterward 
  • Starring: John Malkovich (Valmont,) Glenn Close (Isabelle Merteuil,) Michelle Pfeiffer (Tourvel,) Uma Thurman (Cecile,) Swoosie Kurtz (Madame de Volanges,) and Keanu Reeves as Danceny. 

Clips used:

  • Isabelle talks about why she manipulates men
  • Dangerous Liaisons trailer
  • Valmont promises Tourvel they can be freinds
  • Valmont and Dancey have a duel
  • Audience boos
  • Music by George Fenton

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

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Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Aug 19, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Heartburn” 

The “Nora Ephron is a Queen” Episode  

Norah Ephron was one of the most celebrated writers of the 20th Century from her work as an essayist for Esquire to her best-selling novels and screenplays for classic films. She has been honored with Academy Awards, Writer’s Guild Awards, and BAFTAs. She was a food writer and movie director. Known for being tough and uncompromising (who fired a child actor after his day on the set of Sleepless in Seattle!) Yet she was a total romantic who enjoyed a happy marriage with fellow writer Nicholas Pileggi. 

Her first novel, Heartburn, came out in 1983 and was based on her tumultuous marriage to reporter Carl Bernstein (we talked him in our All the President’s Men episode) which ended when he had an affair during her second pregnancy. The “power couple” split and the divorce took years to happen. Mainly because Berstein was concerned about how he would be played in the movie directed by Mike Nichols

Ephron wrote the screenplay for the 1986 film and due to her divorce decree, she had to make sure the character filling for Bernstein (called “Mark Feldman” as a maybe-nod to Mark Felt. The real “Deep Throat” source for Watergate) had to be portrayed as not a jerk. Nichols and Jack Nicholson (who played the Mark Feldman part) were a part of the divorce negotiations. 

Meryl Streep gives an amazing performance as “Rachel Samstat” who loves her husband even though he is having an affair while she is in her second trimester. It’s frustrating to hear her character lose her voice in this translation--but we will talk ALL about that in this episode plus the awful reviews some male critics gave the film. 

Mostly we talk about the wonderful Norah Ephron and why she is one of the wisest, funniest, and most romantic writers of her generation.

So, between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? (Honestly, it is not going to even be close but have a listen anyway!) 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

Clips used:

  • Rachel has a hallucination
  • Heartburn trailer
  • Rachel confronts Mark about his cheating 
  • Rachel hits Mark in the face with a pie
  • Music: Coming Around Again by Carly Simon

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Aug 10, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Almost Famous”

Based on several articles by Cameron Crowe in Rolling Stone Vs the 2000 film 

In 1973, writer Cameron Crowe was just your ordinary 16-year-old on the road with The Allman Brothers writing a cover story about the band’s troubles and successes while going on the road. The resulting article came out in December 1973 and changed his life becoming a well-respected journalist who covered the biggest bands of the 70s including Led Zeppelin, The Who, and The Eagles all before he was old enough to have a driver’s license. 

Years later, he would spend a year undercover as a high school student at Clairmont High School in San Diego to write Fast Times at Ridgemont High  (it would become his first screenplay as well.) Later films of his include Say Anything, Jerry Maguire, and Singles but the film that most closely resembles his life is Almost Famous

The story of William Miller (played by newcomer Patrick Fugit) a teenager who gets the assignment of his dreams--to write about the new band “Stillwater” for Rolling Stone magazine. Along the way, he befriends “Band-Aids” who are NOT groupies but rather muses for their favorite musicians. Led by 16-year-old Penny Lane (Kate Hudson in an Academy Award-nominated performance) she follows lead guitarist Russell Hammond (Billy Crudup) on the road and teaches William how to live life as if there were no tomorrow. 

The movie is filled with rock-n-roll tropes such as greedy managers, awful promoters (Marc Maron’s “lock the gates!” intro on the WTF podcast comes from this movie,) sex, drugs, and misogyny abound. There is also a great deal of heart and warmth here with Frances McDormand playing William’s tough but loving mother. Zooey Deschanel plays his stewardess sister who is running away to find herself in the early 1970s. 

The film was a big hit for all involved and the budget for the soundtrack (which includes more classic rock classics than can seem bearable) was reportedly $3 million. Crowe won an Academy Award for his screenplay and Hudson became the movie Rom-Com queen for the next 20 years. 

There has been controversy, however, with THE ultimate groupie (no shame in her game!) Pamela Des Barres is NOT consulted even though she wrote the seminal work on fandom I’m With the Band. And by the way, aren’t they a little young to be on the road? 

So, between the original Cameron Crow articles and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The life story of Cameron Crowe
  • What classic rock and touring meant in the 1970s 
  • Almost Famous trivia
  • Which actors did their own singing and played their own instruments 
  • The cast: Patrick Fugit (William Miller,) Billy Crudup (Russell Hammond,) Frances McDormand (Elaine Miller,) Kate Hudson (Penny Lane,) Jason Lee (Jeff Bebe,) Zooey Deschanel (Anita Miller,) Anna Paquin (Polexia Aphrodesia,) Fairuza Balk (Sapphire,) Philip Seymour Hoffman (Lester Bangs,) Terry Chen (Ben Fong Torres,) Jimmy Fallon (Dennis Hope,) Marc Maron (angry promoter) and Peter Frampton as Reg.

Clips used:

  • William finds out he is 11
  • Almost Famous trailer
  • Lester Bangs
  • Ben Fong Torres & Rolling Stone 
  • Lock the gates!
  • New manager
  • Frances McDormand talks with Billy Crudup
  • Music Fever Dog by Stillwater 

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

.

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 

 

Aug 5, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Dog Day Afternoon”

The Classic Hollywood 1974 film Vs “The Boys in the Bank” from 1972 article from Life Magazine

On August 22, 1972, John Wojtowicz and two accomplices entered a bank In Brooklyn at 450 Avenue P (in Gravesend) and started a robbery. One left early, (20-year-old Bobby Westeberg) while Wojtowicz and 18-year-old Sal Naturale proceeded to steal almost $200,000 in cash and traveler’s checks before being surrounded by the police. What happened for the next 14 hours was a standoff and media circus for the ages. 

Turns out Wojtowicz said he needed the money for a “sex change” operation (as it was known at the time)  for his partner Ernest Aron. The police brought Aron to the scene straight from the hospital where they had attempted suicide the week before. Another of Wojtowicz lover was brought out and he kissed him on the mouth in front of the news camera which hundreds of locals who made up the crowd. He also threw money into the air and ordered pizza for the bank hostages held inside. 

Eventually, the robbers and many of the bank hostages were taken to JFK airport where Naturale was shot in the chest and killed immediately. Wojtowicz was arrested and eventually spent a few years in jail for his crimes. He married again while in prison and had a tough time holding down a job because of his past. In the end, he was reduced to trying to make some money by posing in front of the bank for autographs. He died of cancer in 2006 at the age of 60. 

Aron eventually had gender reassignment surgery and died from the complications of AIDS in 1987. She took the name, Elizabeth Eden. 

Writers P.F. Kluge and Thomas Moore wrote about the crime and hostage situation on September 22, 1972, for Life magazine and the title of the article was “The Boys in the Bank” that was bought by Warner Brothers pictures and developed into the film Dog Day Afternoon

The 1975 film directed by Sidney Lumet and screenplay by Frank Pierson changes a few of the major details. The lead crook is “Sonny Wortzik” played by Al Pacino and his main cohort is Sal Naturile played by 40-year-old acting legend John Cazale. Filmed in Winsdor Terrace, Brooklyn (near Margo D’s home!) the movie would become a huge moneymaker and nominated for all of the major categories at the Academy Awards in 1976 (and losing most to One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest which was the movie to beat that season.) 

The film is a modern classic and entered in 2009 to the Library of Congress and in the National Film Registry. 

In 2014, The Dog a documentary by filmmakers Allison Berg and Frank Keraudren told the “real” story by following the real John Wojtowicz who painted himself as an early gay rights icon and misunderstood human.  

So, between the original novel and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The backstory behind the 1972 robbery & the aftermath 
  • The biggest differences between the real story and the 1975 film 
  • Rumors as to who was really behind the bank robbery
  • What happened to the main figures 
  • The cast: Al Pacino (Sonny Wotzik,) John Cazale (Sal Naturile,) Charles Durning (Sergeant Eugene Moretti,) Penelope Allen (Sylvia,) Susan Peretz (Angie,) James Broderick (FBI agent,) Lance Henricksen (FBI agent,) Carol Kane (The Squirrel,) and Chris Sarandon as Leon Shermer.

Clips used:

  • The bank robbery
  • Dog Day Afternoon trailer
  • Sonny negotiates with Moretti
  • “Leon” comes to the site
  • Final phone call for Sonny and his wife
  • “Wyoming?” 
  • Music Amoreena by Elton John

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 




Jul 30, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Logan’s Run”

The Cult Classic Novel & Film That Inspired Generations of SciFi Fans 

Imagine living in a world where you can live as free as you please, but you have to allow yourself to be killed at 21 (or 30?) This dystopian tale comes from two science fiction authors, William F. Nolan and George Clayton Johson in 1976 with Logan’s Run. Logan is a “Sandman” who chases “runners” who wish to escape their creepy fate. 

The original story was inspired by the turbulent campus life in the 1960s and caught the imagination of SciFi fans everywhere. The setting is 2116, and from the “Little War,” it was decided that in order for earth to survive, the population needed to be kept artificially down. People live with a “palm flower” that changes color as they age. When they hit 21, it is called their ‘last day” and to report to “Sleepshop.” It is there they are killed using a pleasure-increasing toxic gas. 

Logan being a Deep Sleep Operative, he can tell when people are trying to escape their fate and run to a free land called “Sanctuary.” He uses a gun called a “homer” because it can “home” their body heat and evaporate them. Sandmen also use martial arts and generally have no sympathy for runners. 

Logan’s love interest in “Jessica 6” distrusts him at first but eventually along with Logan’s friend Francis they off to the Sanctuary. Francis, it turns out, is an oldster of 42 whose palm flower malfunctioned and he got by with plastic surgery to change his appearance Jessica and Logan are then sent off on a rocket outside of Mars to start their lives over. 

The 1976 movie stars Michael York as Logan 5 and Jenny Agutter as Jessica 6. The movie changes the maximum age to 30 and this time the “last dayers” end their lives in a game called the “Carrousel” which causes them to evaporate in front of an audience. 

In 2274, every person is implanted with a “life clock” that shows their age. Logan 5 and his friend Francis 7 are both Sandmen who one day kill a runner who had an “ankh” jewelry symbol. Turns out this symbol is for people who are looking for “Sanctuary” and that is how he identifies Jessica 6. 

They go on the run together and there is quite a bit of wackiness with a robot named Box who wants to freeze and eat them, Washington DC mossed over and an old man with cats who wants to help them. There are also sexy costumes and special effects which were considered a big deal at the time. (Wow!) 

So, between the original novel and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The journey of the 1967 story to the 1976 movie
  • Biggest changes between book & movie
  • The 1977 TV series that surprisingly did not take off
  • The special effects of the time
  • The cast: Michael York (Logan 5,) Jenny Agutter (Jessica 6,) Richard Jordan (Francis 7,) Roscoe Lee Browne (Box voice), Farrah Fawcett-Majors (Holly 13), and Peter Ustinov as the Old Man. 

Clips used:

  • Logan decides to run
  • Logan’s Run trailer
  • “The Carousel” 
  • Logan procures Jessica 6 
  • Jessica and Logan meet “The Box”
  • Music by Jerry Goldsmith

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





Jul 21, 2021

Book Vs Movie: “Legally Blonde”

The Amanda Brown Story Vs the Reese Witherspoon Movie 

The Margos are donning their pink outfits and getting our nails done in preparation for one of our most fun episodes--Legally Blonde. The original writer is Amanda Brown who based some of the stories about Elle Woods on her experience as a  law student at Stanford University. As she said at the time ‘I wrote it all on pink paper with my furry pink pen.” It has an unusual publishing history as it was rejected by every major publishing house but became a bidding war with the movie studios. MGM won the bid and Reese Witherspoon was set to star. 

Screenwriters Karen McCullah Lutz and Kirsten Smith spent two weeks at Stanford Law School in 2000 to get a flavor of what campus life is like. Reese Witherspoon spent hundreds of dollars on a bar tab for a group of sorority girls to pick up their lingo and a movie was created. 

The original story is missing a few things from the beloved film including the character of Emmett Richmond (played by Luke Wilson) and Elle actually working hard to get into law school. 

At first, in the age of raunchy films like American Pie being popular with audiences, the movie had an edgier quality. But writers McCullah Lutz & Smith decided to add more romance (and NOT with her law professor,) give her favorite manicurist her own backstory and change the plot of the murder trials. 

The film was a massive hit when released and its feminist slant and fashions inspired generations of women to become lawyers. There was a sequel in 2003 and a musical that appeared on both Broadway and the London stage. 

So, between the novel and the movie--which did we prefer? Have a listen and find out! 

In this ep the Margos discuss:

  • The journey of the novel to screenplay
  • Biggest changes between book & movie
  • The casting process and how the wardrobe is the main factor of the film’s popularity
  • The cast: Reese Witherspoon (Elle Woods,) Moonie (Bruiser Woods,) Selma Blair (Vivian,) Luke Wilson (Emmett Richmond,) Matthew Davis (Warner,) Victor Garber (Professor Callahan,) Jennifer Coolidge (Paulette,) Holland Taylor (Professor Stromwell,) Ali Larter (Brooke,) Jessica Cauffiel (Margot,) and Linda Cardellini (Chutney Windham.) 

Clips used:

  • Elle’s entrance video
  • Legally Blonde trailer
  • First day of school
  • Elle meets Emmett 
  • Bend and Snap!
  • Perfect Day by Hoku 

Book Vs Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts

Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie 

Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/

Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com

Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com

Brought to you by Audible.com You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R

Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com

Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/ 

Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 





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